How to Set up a Data Backup Process for your WordPress Membership Site

The last thing any website owner wants to deal with is lost website data. This is particularly important for a membership site, where revenue is directly generated online. Keeping up to date backups of your website’s data is not as difficult as you may think. This post covers that often overlooked but highly important topic: data backups, but more specifically:


Your WordPress database contains every post, every comment and every link you have on your blog. If your database gets erased or corrupted, you stand to lose everything you have written. There are many reasons why this could happen and not all are things you can control. With a proper backup of your WordPress database and files, you can quickly restore things back to normal.
via WordPress.org

First, ask yourself “What is my current backup process?”

If the answer to this question is “I have no idea”, you really need this post. Most people aren’t aware of their backup process (or lack of one) until they experience a devastating loss of data. You don’t want to be in that position – so put a solid process in place now.

If you have some process in place, great job! You’re probably 90% ahead of most websites we work with. But be sure to also test recovering from a backup every once in a while to make sure that your backup is actually working.

I’m interested to learn any unique insights you have about your backup process in the comments below.


What to Back Up

Your WordPress website is powered by two key components: your site’s MySQL database and the files in your site’s web folder. Both components should be backed up and both offer unique backup options.

If you store protected files or video outside of your “web root folder” or on a third party service like Amazon S3, make sure that those files are also being backed up.

Depending on the size of your website and number of plugins installed, the database and files may be over 1GB of data. If this is the case, take a look at your data and see what information could be excluded from the regular backup process. Also, make sure that you are not including your backup archives in an automated backup (this would happen if you are storing a copy of your backup in the web root folder, and the backup process includes the entire web root folder).


Where to Back Up

We advise backing up in three or more distinct places. You can store a backup on your membership site’s web server, on a totally separate web server or cloud environment, emailed to a “backups” email account, as well as local copies saved to your computer, a local server, and physically saved to external media (DVD, external hard drive, flash drive).

wp-backup-infographic


When to Back Up

Depending on how frequently you update your site, it may be important to perform a data backup on a weekly or even daily process.

Since you are running a membership site, you are managing all of the key data that synchronizes the member subscriptions from the payment gateway. Losing this data would cause a huge headache and may require you to piece together weeks or months of data manually. No thank you!

We recommend setting up a more frequent automatic backup process (daily) as well as a weekly or monthly manual backup. Pick a day, put it on your calendar, and do it. Once the process is in place it will be a quick step in your workflow providing invaluable piece of mind.


  1. Option 1: Host Backups

    Your host is (or should be) mirroring your site across a few data centers. This is one small level of data assurance but not a replacement for a true backup plan. This only insulates you from your host losing your website data, not from data corruption, a virus or malware injection, or the administrator that accidentally deletes all or some of your site data (true story).

    Depending on your web hosting company, there may be a simple way to create a data backup, either via a web tool installed in your WordPress admin, or directly within your hosting account dashboard. These one-click backups can often be downloaded or emailed to you for the local/physical backup copy I discussed above.

    It’s important to make sure that this one-click backup is including BOTH your site files and the MySQL database for your WordPress site. I suggest exploring your host’s support library or contacting them directly to better understand your backup options.

    Here are some backup processes for commonly used WordPress hosts:
    WP Engine | SiteGround | Bluehost | Pagely


  2. Option 2: Direct File Transfer + Manual Database Backup

    This requires a bit more developer experience, but the basic concept is that you are manually downloading the web server files and creating a direct backup of the MySQL database via phpMyAdmin.

    Files Backup

    Connect to your web server and simply download the entire folder via FTP. Or, if you have SSH access, you can use the command line to create a .zip backup of the entire website files on the server. We create this .zip file and name it according to the date the backup was taken. A copy of that .zip file remains on the server in a “backups” folder, and a copy of the .zip file is downloaded locally to our computer and saved to external media.

    If your web root folder is called public_html, you could use these commands to make a backup. Note that we backup * (all files) and also list .htaccess separately. Because this is a hidden file, the zip command will ignore it unless you specify it like this. If you have any special caching or rewrite rules in your .htaccess file, you will need these to restore your site 100%.

    To download the .zip file, just navigate to the folder and file name in your web browser. (i.e. http://www.YOURDOMAIN.com/backup.zip)

    Be sure to delete the backup.zip file or move it out of the web root after you download to keep others from stumbling upon it.


    Database Backup

    Access your website’s control panel or web hosting admin. From here, you should be able to access your site’s MySQL database via phpMyAdmin. (You can alternately use the Adminer plugin by Inpsyde to access your MySQL database directly through your WordPress admin.

    Click the “Export” tab. We recommend the following settings:

    phpmyadmin_export_settings

    If you database isn’t too large, you can also use the plugin WP DB Backup for an on-demand backup of your WordPress database. The backup file created by this plugin is saved in your site’s /wp-content/ folder or you can download the backup file for a local copy (we recommend doing both). Backups of large databases can be slow no matter what method you are using, but because of the way WP DB Backup works, we’ve found it to be especially slow for very large databases. You can usually just leaving it running for a while in a background tab of your browser if you find this is the case.

    Database Backup From the Command Line

    You can use the mysqldump command to create a backup of your database from the linux command line. If you grab the database name, username, and password from your wp-config.php file, you can then use the following commands.

    I have this saved as a shell script outside of my web root folder and run the script before any update or risky change to the site.


  3. Option 3: WordPress Site Backup Services

    These third-party backup services offer many features related to file backups (themes, plugins, uploads), database backup, site cloning/migration, as well as optional spam security, automated restore points, and support should you find yourself in a data-loss pickle.

    The features vary by company and price, so I’d encourage you to explore the options below when making your decision. These are some of the most widely used options available:


  4. Bonus #4: Restoring From a Backup and Testing Recovery

    If you run a website for any number of years, the chances are you are going to have to restore from a backup at some point. Stuff happens.

    But, even if your site is running flawlessly and you never have experienced a data loss, you should still test restoring from a backup to make sure that your backup is actually working.

    To restore your site, you will need both the backup of the files and the database. Exactly how to restore your site by creating a “dev” or “staging” site will depend on your specific DNS and hosting setup, but here are the rough steps.

    1. Ideally, create a subdomain for your test site, like test.mysite.com or staging.mysite.com. If you can’t create a new subdomain, you can create a subfolder on your existing site like mysite.com/test/.
    2. Create a new database for the test site. Import your database backup.
    3. Upload the zip file of your files backup to the server and then unzip them.
    4. Edit the wp-config.php file in your test site to change the database name, username, and password and any other settings that might need to be updated.
    5. Edit your .htaccess if needed.
    6. If doing a test (vs an actual restore on the same domain) use a script like searchreplacedb2 to change instances of your domain in the database to the domain of the test site.

    Special Notes on Staging Sites with Paid Memberships Pro

    Please note that staging sites are still real websites that might interact with your customers directly or indirectly. Emails initiated on your test site will get sent to real email addresses. If you cancel a PMPro membership on the staging site, your members will get an email, and PMPro will try to cancel the subscription at the gateway and/or the user’s subscription to your mailing list at Mailchimp/etc.

    Additionally, plugins like Paid Memberships Pro perform certain actions like expirations and subscription synching every night as a “WP Cron” process. If you make an exact copy of your live site to a staging site, your staging site will also run these scripts at night. It is important to disable these services using something like our PMPro Toolkit addon or disable your staging site after testing (by deleting it or maybe adding break; to the top of your .htaccess file) to keep these scripts from running. The PMPro Toolkit addon specifically stops PMPro related scripts, but other plugins may still be running scripts of their own.

    Staging sites can also be an attack vector for malware and viruses if they are left online and not updated regularly like your main site. So be sure to either delete your staging site when you are finished with it, set up a plugin like Coming Soon Page & Maintenance Mode by SeedProd, or keep it up to date like any other WordPress site.


Now go make a backup! Then, design and initiate your backup process.

The easiest first step is to choose one of the methods above and create your first backup. Once you have done that you will get a feel for how the selected method works for you, your skill set, and your workflow. There is no one “right” answer here, just the very wrong answer of doing nothing at all.

I hope that the backup process you select on easily fits within your week-to-week (or day-to-day) business. Post a comment below if you have more to add or a questions about any of the methods outlined above.

How to Hide the WordPress Dashboard (and build a better one) For Your Members

WordPress allows all user roles access to view an access-level appropriate version of the WordPress Dashboard. For most membership sites, access to this “backend” dashboard is often unnecessary and can be confusing for your users.

Below are some options for blocking this dashboard and redirecting users to the desired page on login.


  1. Redirect Members on Login

    The default login behavior for all WordPress roles is to redirect the user to the WordPress dashboard. Below are links to a few posts we have on customizations to send users to an alternate page, such as the referring URL or a page of your choice based on their level:

    • Redirecting Members on Login
      This recipe will show you how to redirect members to a specific page after logging in.
    • Redirect Members to Pages Based on Their Level
      This post covers how to redirect members to certain pages based on their membership level, allowing each level to have a unique member login destination.
    • Redirect Members to Referrer on Login
      The steps in this guide allow you to set a referrer in the Memberships > Advanced Settings for your “Message for Logged-out Users:”. This way, when a user clicks to “log in” to view the members-only content, they will be redirected back to that URL after login.

    Using these methods, the user will ONLY get into the dashboard when they would like to edit their user profile.

    Bonus tip #1: If you’re considering login redirection, you may also want to check out the Member Homepages Add On. This extension will redirect logged in members to a unique “homepage” based on their level. Any time a member attempts to access the actual site homepage, they will be sent to the appropriate page for them. I find this to be a great help when your site has to serve the dual purpose of marketing and “selling” membership along with being a well planned user experience for actual members.

    View the Add On
  2. Use the plugin Theme My Login

    This plugin handles redirection extremely well, which is why we didn’t include the functionality in Paid Memberships Pro itself. Theme My Login includes a setting to redirect users on login, as well as block dashboard access based on role. We have a longer post detailing the setup and additional features of this plugin here.

    Important: do not disable dashboard access without turning on the “Themed Profiles” module in Theme My Login. If you miss this step, users of the “subscriber” role will not be able to edit their profile.

  3. Use the plugin Hide the Admin Bar from Non-admins

    The plugins above don’t hide the admin bar, which you often want to hide as well. There are other plugins in the WP repo to hide the admin bar, but they either (a) hide it for admins as well or (b) require users to disable the bar via their settings. We whipped up our own plugin hide the admin bar for non-admins only.

    View the Plugin


Bonus Tip #2: Building a Member Dashboard

It’s great that you’re taking the time to consider the user experience and build a better login redirection process. But, what page are you going to actually redirect your users to?

I wrote a previous post on building a dashboard for your members. The post covers some recommendations to enhance your Membership Account page based on the type of site you’re running. Redirecting to the Membership Account page is a strong login experience as it provides detailed information about your member. And, if you take time to enhance this page with links to members content, the dashboard is an even more powerful landing page after login.

View the Guide on Member Dashboards

Let me know in the comments below if you have recommendations or requests related to login redirection—these are simply the most common ways we help users get their redirects in place.

How to Name Your Membership Levels or Subscription Options

How you name your membership levels is one of the most important components for conversions on your membership on site.

Let’s spend some time thinking about membership level names. We’ll cover the classic membership site structures and provide examples for naming the membership levels or subscription options for each case. (And there’s even a nifty “level name” playground that tests your name within various plugin-generated phrases.)


Take a step back and evaluate your membership level names.

I work with thousands of membership sites and have seen a lack of clarity (and creativity) in this key area. The membership level name identifies what the member is receiving in exchange for their membership fee. In some cases, the name is a badge of pride for your members, turning them from the anonymous “visitor” to a member of the “in-crowd”.

Putting all of this touchy-feely stuff aside, the level name is also used in various default “phrases” within your membership site system. You need to make sure your level name “reads well” within these phrases. I’ve created a simple tool at the end of this article that provides a litmus test for your level names within the key system phrases in Paid Memberships Pro.


Membership Site Structures Covered include:


Tiered/Hierarchical Levels

This flavor of membership site offers more (or fewer) features based on membership level. This is the structure of our own site here at Paid Memberships Pro. We offer a Free, Core and Plus level. I think the level names are OK, and they do imply a tier (Unlimited being the highest membership option available).

Here are some level name ideas based on the “tier”

Tier 1
  • Basic
  • Beginner
  • Starter
  • Primary
  • Bronze
  • Baby Bear

Tier 2
  • Intermediate
  • Enhanced
  • Standard
  • Secondary
  • Gold
  • Papa Bear

Tier 3
  • Advanced
  • Ultimate
  • Extreme
  • Professional
  • Platinum
  • Mama Bear (just right!)


Price/Payment Term Structured Levels

Use this level naming structure when all membership levels offer the same package of features, but vary based on price or term. First, try to think of something clever based on your specific name, brand or site topic.

If your membership site was a sports team, what would you call your fans?

You can give membership an overall brand, such as “Trekkies”, “Bronies”, or “Cheeseheads”. Then use your level names to clarify the price or payment term.

You may still have an idea of “tier” in this structure, such as a Foodie Box site that offers 3 Month, 6 Month, and Annual subscriptions, with the option to “add on” a dessert box. For this case, I’d suggest reading through my post on price-adjusting Register Helper fields to have a selection at checkout modify the level price. Easy as pie.

Here are some level name ideas based on the price/term

  • Daily *
  • Weekly
  • Monthly
  • Quarterly
  • Yearly

  • Annual
  • Per Annum
  • Bi-Weekly
  • Bi-Monthly
  • Semi-Annual

  • Half-Yearly
  • Perennial
  • Lifetime
  • Forever
  • Eternal

* Note that not all integrated gateways offer “daily” subscriptions.


Content Vertical/Category-specific Levels

In this type of membership site, the membership levels differ not by features, but by type of content or “vertical”. This is common in a stock or investing site, nationwide membership chapters site, or an online dating site where identifying the member’s “interest” is handled via the membership level selected.

Here are some level name ideas based on the content vertical

  • Stock/Investing Sites: Technology Sector, Gas and Oil, Retail, Pharmaceuticals
  • Member Chapter Sites: Country Name, State Name, County Name
  • Online Dating Sites: Man Seeking Woman, Woman Seeking Man, Man Seeking Man, Woman Seeking Woman, etc.

User or Member-type Levels

This is a category of membership site where the member receives a different level/price/package based on the type of member they are. Check out our Sponsored/Group Members Add On if you have a membership level that offers parent/child account relationships.

Here are some level name ideas based on the user/member-type

  • Individual
  • Student
  • Parent
  • Family

  • Senior
  • Corporation
  • Volunteer

  • Teacher
  • Non-Profit
  • Military: Active Duty and Veterans


Content Delivery/Subscription Type Levels

For this type of membership site, the levels differ by how the content is received. It will make more sense after reading the level names below, but basically this case is used when the content is offered in various formats (online, print, email), and the selected level determines the members’ preferred method(s) of content delivery.

For this case, you could use the same membership branding concepts covered in the Price/Payment Term Structured Levels section above, then use the level names to clarify content delivery.

Here are some level name ideas based on the type of content delivery

  • Online Only
  • Print Only
  • Online and Print
  • Email Newsletter

Sponsorship Level/Benefactor Tiers

If you’re a non-profit organization, you most likely think about membership a bit differently than most other site types. In your case, membership level is actually sponsorship level, and you have a chance to get really creative in how you name your tiers.

A great approach to level naming is to pull ideas from the goals of your organization, your location, the group or cause you represent.

Instead of coming up with my own examples, I’ve compiled a few non-profits and their benefactor/membership tier names below:

The Franklin Institute’s Benefactor Society

  • Pendulum Partners
  • Baldwin Circle
  • Celestial Circle
  • Ambassador Circle
  • Kite and Key Circle
  • Franklin Fellows
  • Inventors Circle

Colonial Williamsburg’s Donor Societies

  • Duke of Gloucester Society
  • Capitol Society
  • Colonial Williamsburg Assembly
  • Colonial Williamsburg Burgesses
  • Colonial Williamsburg Associates
  • Raleigh Tavern Society

The Kimmel Center’s Founders Circle

  • Partner
  • Benefactor
  • Artists Circle
  • Leadership Circle
  • Presidents Circle
  • Chairmans Circle


Go Forth and Name Ye Levels!

I hope this post has given you some direction as you brainstorm level names for your new or existing membership site. If you have a type of membership site that wasn’t covered, post a comment below so we can discuss some level naming conventions for your site.

If you run an existing membership site, you can still rename your membership levels. With Paid Memberships Pro you can simply update the level names under Memberships > Edit Level in the admin. Every member that currently has that membership level will automatically have their membership level name updated.


Time to Play

The Membership Level Names Playground below allows you to enter a desired membership level name and see how it will “read” within various plugin-generated phrases. These are the most common phrases your members will see, both on your site and in membership-related emails.

Test your level name against key phrases in Paid Memberships Pro.

Enter a level name to test:


You have selected the My Level Name membership level.
Shown on the membership checkout page.


Membership Level: My Level Name
Shown in most member communication emails and invoices.


Your My Level Name membership is now active.
Shown on the membership confirmation page.

If you have a level name that doesn’t pass the litmus test, don’t fret. Every phrase in Paid Memberships Pro can be “translated”, and I’m not just talking about languages.

Our blog has several posts on renaming key terms within the plugin, such as this post about replacing the word “Membership” with “Subscription”.

Depending on your membership site, you may need to use these methods or another approach. Just open a topic in our members forum (provided to PMPro Plus and Unlimited members), and we will help you work out any hiccups between your desired membership level name and the built in phrases of Paid Memberships Pro.

New Integration for Holler Box: Popup/Banner Notifications to Increase Sales and Leads

Display Holler Boxes by Membership Level with this new integration between Holler Box and Paid Memberships Pro.

View the Add On


How it Works

The Holler Box plugin by Scott Bolinger allows you to create popups or banner notifications that display on the front end of your website. eCommerce site owners are using these popups to collect leads and generate more sales.

Our new integration adds Membership restrictions to your boxes, allowing you to display unique content based on the user’s membership status, either a specific level or for no level (non-member). This integration requires the basic version of Holler Box from the WordPress repository and our integration plugin, Holler Box Integration for Paid Memberships Pro.


Other Holler Box Features: FOMO Popups

The Pro version of Holler Box has another extension that displays Sales Notifications. This means that as members complete checkout on your site, the box will notify visitors of the sale. Your site visitors will think, “hey other people are buying, I should buy too!” You can read more about this extension on their documentation page.

Special Discount for PMPro Members

Save 20% off the Holler Box Pro bundle, which includes Holler Box Pro and the FOMO popups. Use discount code PMP20 at checkout. https://hollerwp.com/pro/

Create and Manage Affiliates by Membership Level Using AffiliateWP

This code recipe creates affiliates or updates the status of existing affiliates based on their membership level when using AffiliateWP.

The affiliate is created after their membership level is changed to the appropriate level (in the recipe, this is level ID 1). When membership is cancelled or expires, the affiliate’s status is changed to “inactive”.

This page requires a PMPro Core Account or higher.

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Add On Updates for July 2017

This post recaps the Paid Memberships Pro Add Ons recently updated. PMPro Plus members can upgrade through their WordPress dashboard under Dashboard > Updates or Memberships > Add Ons. Be sure to backup your site before performing updates.


Approval Process for Membership Add On

The Approvals Add On grants membership site administrators the ability to approve or deny members.

v1.0.2 of the Add On now shows a count of pending approvals in the menu row. This provides admins with an alert that there are members pending approval. Additionally, if you set a level to require another level’s approval, that level will automatically be set to require approval as well.

View the Add On


bbPress Add On

Using this Add On, you can create members-only forum in bbPress. The recent updates to this add on fixed fatal error when bbPress was not activated. We’ve also added a session variable when redirecting members away from protected forums. The referring page is now saved in $_SESSION['pmpro_bbp_redirected_from'] so that you can reference this in custom code.

View the Add On


Kissmetrics Add On

Integrates Kissmetrics with your WordPress site, allowing you to track meaningful data not only about users, but about how they are interacting with the Memberships sections of your website.

v.3.1 of the Kissmetrics integration adds support for localization as well as the filter pmprokm_is_trial to determine if the level is a trial or not (useful for deeper analysis of member interactions within the Kissmetrics reports).

View the Add On


Lock Membership Level

Adds the ability for the admin or membership manager to lock a user’s membership level or lock all members of a level for a specified term (for required installments).

Recent updates to this add on include:

  • BUG FIX: Incorrect text domain for translation
  • BUG FIX: Partially complete default values for level settings
  • BUG FIX: Locked members were able to unlock their profile through the Edit Profile page.
  • BUG FIX: Fixed other bugs with the settings on the edit membership level page. (Thanks, Ted Barnett)
  • SECURITY: Added sanitization of settings on the edit level and edit user/profile pages.

View the Add On


Membership Manager Role Add On

This Add On creates a new user role in your WordPress site. The role of “Membership Manager” allows them to manage your Paid Memberships Pro settings, without complete administrator access.

We’ve added support for the Approval Process for Membership Add On so that this role can process approvals. The role is also now loaded on admin_init instead of activation so capabilities are updated when the plugin updates.

View the Add On


Nav Menus

This Add On creates member navigation menus and swaps your theme’s menu areas or menus placed via widget based on a user’s Membership Level.

The Add On was recently updated to include a conditional menu state for a logged-in user with no membership level. You can now use this condition in both the Appearance > Menus > Menu Locations or via the Appearance > Widgets > Custom Menu widget.

View the Add On


Pay by Check Add On

This Add On provides a collection of customizations useful when allowing users to pay by check for Paid Memberships Pro levels.

It was recently updated to fix an issue where the PayPal button was still displaying when the “check” option was chosen. We’ve also enhanced the Add On by showing a better non-member-text notice when pending members try to access content. The new message will read:

Your payment is currently pending. You will gain access to this page once it is approved.

The message can be filtered using the gettext filter in WordPress.

View the Add On


Register Helper: Add Checkout and Profile Fields

Register Helper is a robust add on to collect additional fields at membership signup. Fields can be collected at membership checkout, on the user’s profile or for administrative view-only.

Recent updates to this add on include:

  • BUG FIX: Incorrect function definition (static vs non-static).
  • BUG FIX: Didn’t save RH fields from pmpro-add-member-admin
  • ENHANCEMENT: Updated Readme, including instructions.
  • ENHANCEMENT: Added logic to only load CSS and JS on the checkout and profile pages on the frontend and profile and edit user pages in the dashboard.

View the Add On


Shipping Address on Membership Checkout

The Shipping Address Add On adds fields to the membership checkout page, confirmation page, confirmation emails, member’s list and edit user profile pages to capture a separate “Shipping Address” for members.

The plugin was recently updated to repair warnings related to the use of the deprecated get_usermeta function as well as issues around the display of fields when “same as billing” was selected. We’ve also added a new pmproship_required_shipping_fields filter for developers.

View the Add On


VAT Tax Add On

Our VAT Tax Add On calculates VAT tax at checkout based on the customer’s selected EU country of residence and allows customers with a VAT Number to avoid the tax. The entered VAT number is validated using the SOAP service provided through the European Commission.

We’ve recently added GeoIP support to this add on to automatically detect the user’s country. You must install and activate the GeoIP Detect plugin in order to take advantage of this integration. The current release now converts GB to UK when validating VAT numbers, since GB is the expected value for validation in the VAT service. The AJAX code has also been updated to avoid issues on sites with PHP warnings/etc.

View the Add On

There’s Now a Better Way to Browse our 75+ Add Ons

We’ve made it easier to browse our Add Ons with category filters and ‘ease of use’ ratings. Continue reading for a description of each category and details on how the ratings impact the ongoing development of our Add Ons library.


New Categorization = Easier Filtering

When we realized the number of our Free and Plus Add Ons (all included in our PMPro Plus-Level membership) had gotten so large, we knew something had to be done to improve the browsing experience. Users needed a way to sort through the growing number of extensions to find the right features to improve their membership site.

Add On Categories Include:


Plugins that help Administrators stay organized and better manage their PMPro-powered membership site.

Plugins to add features to the checkout experience, such as country/region-specific needs, capturing fields, member communications, payment gateways, security, or tax compliance.

Extend the capabilities of PMPro’s built-in member restrictions for your specific membership features, including unique content, advertisements, directories, media, events, online communities, and more.

These Add Ons allow you to integrate with third-party email marketing platforms, make customizations to default member communications, and work with other plugins for newsletters targeted by membership level.

These plugins add specialized features to your membership site, providing a more complete (and unique) members experience.

These official Paid Memberships Pro plugins are available to download for any membership level. Some are available in the WordPress repository and can be installed through Plugins –> Add New.

These plugins provide a bridge between your PMPro-powered membership site and popular third-party plugins or services, ranging from e-commerce, email marketing/CRM, social networks, affiliates, and more.

These Add Ons specifically handle how you Get Paid for your membership levels by modifying the price, terms, payment methods, taxes, and more.

All of these Add Ons are included in our PMPro Plus membership. Members can access download links on this site, or via the Memberships » Add Ons page of your WordPress site with a valid PMPro License Key.

The Add Ons below are some of the most widely used extensions available for Paid Memberships Pro.

Improve the member’s experience on your site through these User Add Ons, ranging from UI/UX, design, features, and more, all aimed at increasing value for your members.

Ease of Use Rating

Each Add On now has a rating for how easy (or difficult) we feel the plugin is to set up, plan for, and integrate into your membership site.

Not only will these ratings allow you to make more informed choices for your skills, they help us identify which Add Ons need to be improved. We are making an internal commitment to improve the ease of use for more Add Ons wherever possible, which means less coding for you and your developers.


Here’s a general description of what each rating means:

4: The full features of this Add On are immediately available after activation.

Example: Capture Name & Address for Free Levels or for Offsite Gateway


3: After activating this Add On, you will need to configure a few settings and options via the WordPress Dashboard.

Example: Email Templates Admin Editor


2: Configuring this Add On requires multiple settings and/or may require basic WordPress and PHP coding skills to set up.

Example: Developer’s Toolkit


1: An experienced WordPress developer will be able to help you install and use this add on.

Example: Member Network Sites


Now go browse some Add Ons

We hope you like this improvement to the Add Ons pages. We’d like to give a shout out to our team member, Travis, who helped with all of the design (including the custom icons for each Add On).



 

Improve a Level’s Pricing Statement with the Custom Level Cost Text Add On

Our newly extended Custom Level Cost Text Add On allows you to modify the default level cost text per level, per discount code, or globally via advanced settings.


Special shout-out to David!

The enhancements to this add on were completed by our summer intern, David. This was the first project that David worked on with our team here at PMPro, and we’re very impressed with the end result. David is a Computer Science student at Haverford College (our CEO Jason Coleman’s alma mater).


How it Works

This plugin adds a “level cost text” field to Membership Levels and Discount Codes, allowing you to override PMPro’s default level cost text. When crafting your custom level cost text message, you can use completely custom text or variables based on the level or discount code’s settings.

You can also modify the cost text globally via Advanced Settings. These settings include some of the “most requested” changes to your level price statement:

  • Remove the word “now” from level cost text.
  • Use the word “Free” (or its translation) instead of $0.00.
  • Use “/” instead of “per”.
  • Hide unnecessary decimals. (removes the “.00” portion of the monetary value)
  • Abbreviate billing periods “Month”, “Week”, and “Year” to “Mo”, “Wk”, and “Yr”

Better Level Cost Text with a Better Levels Page

You can use this add on in conjunction with the Advanced Levels Page Shortcode Add On to really tighten up the appearance of your pricing pages. The Custom Level Cost Text Add On filters not only the price on the membership checkout page, but also on your levels page and in emails to the member.

I achieved the price appearance in the screenshot above by setting the Memberships > Advanced Settings to use the word “free”, use “/” instead of “per”, and use abbreviations for billing periods.

View the Add On